British sea explorers’ log books raise new doubts about global warming

British sea explorers’ log books raise new doubts about global warming

There was the same amount of ice floating round Antarctica more than 100 years ago as there is today, a fresh analysis of data provided by the log books of two of Britain's most famous sea explorers suggested.

To the surprise of University of Reading researchers, the log books or records kept by the expeditions of Captain Robert Scott and Sir Ernest Shackleton in the early years of 20th century show there has been little change in the extent of sea ice around Antarctica during the last one hundred years.

Only one area of the Antarctica region, the Wendell Sea, was found to have witnessed a notable reduction of 14 per cent in sea ice coverage.

Lead researcher Dr. Jonathan Day said, "The data collected by these and other explorers could profoundly change the way we view the ebb and flow of Antarctic sea ice. We know that sea ice in the Antarctic has increased slightly over the past 30 years, since satellite observations began."

Scott died during a quest to the South Pole in 1912. Shackleton led an expedition to travel across Antarctica between 1914 and 1917. His ship sank but he was rescued. He died in 1922.

Findings of the new study have further perplexed scientists who have long been struggling to understand climatic trends in the context of global warming.

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