Expected massive shift in consumer thinking for EVs has yet to happen in US: Survey

Expected massive shift in consumer thinking for EVs has yet to happen in US: Survey

Interest in electric vehicles is on the rise in the United States but an expected massive shift in consumer thinking has yet to come about, a new survey indicated. According to the survey by Consumer Reports, popularity of EVs is on the increase and they are increasingly becoming normal or mainstream, but the wider public still is not ready to buy an EV as one for their next vehicle.

Consumer Reports questioned a total of 3,392 US citizens with valid driver’s licenses about their plans to buy a motor vehicle, and found the majority of them saying that that they had at least “some interest” in electric cars but most of them admitted that they had no plans to buy an EV as their next vehicle. Conducted from July to August this year, the survey found 71 per cent saying that they had at least some interest in buying an EV at some point; but only 31 per cent said they would consider buying or leasing an EV as their next vehicle. The survey report concluded that interest for EV among US citizens is on the rise but they are not yet fully ready to adopt EVs.

There are number of reasons that continue to discourage consumers from buying EVs, including range, price, availability of charging stations and general knowledge about EVs.

Commenting on barriers to EV ownership, Consumer Reports’ Harto said, “Among other reasons these people cited as holding them back were purchase price (43% of respondents), insufficient knowledge about EVs (30%), and lack of a place to charge one at home (28%).”

Speaking on the topic, Harto added that it was no surprise that range of EVs and lack of proper charging infrastructure remained major barriers to EV adoption and ownership among American motorists. Nearly 50 per cent of US drivers surveyed said they would like to buy an EV only if it could travel more than 300 miles on a single charge. A little less than 50 per cent of those who said they had no plans to get an EV as their next vehicle said inadequate charging infrastructure was holding them back.

Market experts are of the view that EV adoption will likely become mainstream by the end of 2025; partly due to improvement in range and performance of EVs by that time and partly because of government plans to phase out the production of internal combustion engines.

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